Announcing the EarthCube Early Career Researcher Travel Grant

I feel like I’ve been making lots of funding announcements, but this blog has a slightly special place on the edge of the ecosphere and the geosphere, so it makes sense to broadcast grants that also cross domains, since it’s always fun to get money for the work you do.

logo_earthcube

EarthCube is offering travel grants of $500 for early career researchers (loosely defined) in the geosciences to attend conferences or workshops where they will be presenting material related to the goals of the EarthCube program.  We decided to make decisions four times a year so that researchers could apply closer to the date of the conference.  There’s a total of $15,000 for the year, so please consider applying.  I’ll update later in the year to report some of the metrics we’re using to track the success of the program.

EarthCube related activities could be read fairly broadly, anything intersecting cyberinfrastructure, big data and geosciences related research.  This would include cross-cutting research involving natural hazards, oceanography, hydrology, climate research, paleoecology or paleobiology, with component that leverages new or existing cyberinfrastructure in some way. Looking at EarthCube’s most recent project overview [PDF] is a good starting point to understand how your work fits into EarthCube’s goals.

In addition, this grant has been designed to recognize that under-represented groups within the geosciences may face greater barriers to retention and advancement within the field. In an effort to provide support that would recongize this fact we are offering $1000 to researchers who self-identify as members of an underrepresented group within the geosciences.

FirstClass
All we’re asking for in exchange for a fist-full of moolah (once you’ve applied I mean) is four paragraphs detailling your experience at the conference/workshop and adding some acknowledgement of EathCube’s support in your proposal.  If you want to mention me in particular you can go ahead, but really, it’s not necessary!

If you have any questions feel free to contact me, or use the travel grant email – ec-travel@earthcube.org

Published by

downwithtime

Assistant scientist in the Department of Geography at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Studying paleoecology and the challenges of large data synthesis.

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