My talk at the International Biogeography Society (January 12, 2012)

EDIT:  If you have any comments or questions about the presentation, I`d be happy to answer them in the comments below.

EDIT #2: Following the recommendations of several people on twitter I’ve also decided to upload my talk to Figshare, where it was assigned the DOI 10.6084/m9.figshare.106654 since uploading it yesterday it has had 218 views.  That’s more than the number of people who have viewed it on this blog, and far more than the number of people who saw it at IBS.  I’m a big fan of Figshare!

WalnutFacet95

Figure 1. The kernel density of walnut species in the Upper Midwest shows clear shifts in July precipitation and temperature since settlement. These result from both land us change and shifts in the climate normals. The 95% CI are indicated by rectangles at the bottom of each plot.

I should be preparing my talk, but instead I’d like to attach my talk here just in case you can’t be there.  I’m presenting in the Biogeography of the Anthropocene session, which should be really great.  I’m looking forward to talks by Anthony Barnosky, Naia Morueta-Holme, Carolina Tovar, Kim Diver and Blaise Petitpierre all examining the changes in earth systems, biodiversity and species composition during the last 150 years and into the future, in an age that’s largely defined by the increasing fingerprint of human activity.

My talk will focus on work from my post-doc, looking at how land use change, and climate variability during the settlement era in the upper Midwestern United States has changed the in situ realized niche for several tree species, and has significantly changed composition in both vegetation and the most common vegetation proxy, pollen.

People have been tweeting some of the IBS sessions using the twitter hash tag #ibs13, so maybe someone will be so kind as to tweet mine, and you can follow along with the presentation that I am attaching here.

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One thought on “My talk at the International Biogeography Society (January 12, 2012)

  1. Pingback: Vegetation-­climate relationships using historical climate data from the 19th Century Forts & Observer Database, expanding species realized niches | downwithtime

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